The Intern

JavaScript tooling has gained a huge amount of attention over the past few years, no doubt due to the language’s rapidly increasing popularity and maturity. Many fantastic utilities and powerful debuggers have emerged to help close painful gaps for Web developers, but despite these advancements, high-quality JavaScript testing is still notably absent.

Up to this point, JavaScript authors have had to pick and choose testing tools with incredibly fragmented feature sets. Whereas one tool might support easily running tests manually in many browsers, another might allow command-line automation but only use PhantomJS. A third might be designed to integrate with a continuous integration service, where a fourth might support none of that but allow you to emulate true browser events from outside the JavaScript sandbox. One might have so many plugins that it’s impossible to figure out which ones to use, whereas another might be so inflexible that adding any new features is impossible. It’s a mess.

Intern, from SitePen Labs, is different. It combines all the best features from various testing tools (plus a few new ones of our own) into a single, versatile, easy-to-use, standards-based browser testing stack for JavaScript. We’ve been using this testing framework internally for a while with great success and are really excited to be able to make this level of JavaScript testing available to the entire Web community.

For more information on Intern’s features, usage examples, and documentation, please visit the Intern Web site. If you just want to get started straight away, take a look at the quick start guide. We’ll be making an npm package available very soon to make getting started even easier. Bug reports and feature requests can be posted to the GitHub issue tracker. If you have any other questions, we’re here to help! Free end-user support is currently available via Stack Overflow. SitePen also offers commercial JavaScript support if you need a little extra TLC.

Please let us know in the comments how Intern can work better for you, so you can focus on delivering high-quality code while the Intern does the testing. Happy coding!