Blog

Sep 12

Intern 2.1 released

By on September 12, 2014 9:06 pm

Today we’re happy to announce the release of Intern 2.1. This release contains several bugfixes and improvements to existing functionality, as well as new features to make running tests and handling test results easier. The full list of enhancements and bugfixes is available in the release notes. Here are some of the highlights!

More output options

Two new reporters have been added to Intern: an HTML reporter for the browser client and a JUnit XML reporter.

The HTML reporter is a new default reporter for Intern’s browser client runner (client.html). It displays at the end of a test run, summarizing the test results and presenting them in an easy-to-read format:

The output of the JUnit reporter, on the other hand, is meant for machine consumption. It aggregates test results and outputs them in a report.xml file that follows generally accepted standards for JUnit-compatible XML. This makes it much easier to plug Intern into tools that accept JUnit reports, like Jenkins.

Sep 9

On YUI, Dojo 2, and long-term JavaScript toolkits

By on September 9, 2014 9:20 am

In late August, YUI surprised the JavaScript world by announcing that, effective immediately, development efforts on YUI have been suspended. YUI was a well respected peer of Dojo over the years, and we were surprised to hear this news from Yahoo. The JavaScript community can be very fickle, with new projects created every day. It’s very easy to create open source software, but it’s difficult to create projects that last.

Aug 22

Advanced TypeScript concepts: Classes and types

By on August 22, 2014 8:38 am

While TypeScript is very simple to understand when performing basic tasks, having a deeper understanding of how its type system works is critical to unlocking advanced language functionality. Once we know more about how TypeScript really works, we can leverage this knowledge to write cleaner, well-organised code.

If you find yourself having trouble with some of the concepts discussed in this article, try reading through the Definitive Guide to TypeScript first to make sure you’ve got a solid understanding of all the basics.

Jul 30

Dojo FAQ: Why do I need to use an HTTP server with Dojo?

By on July 30, 2014 11:52 am

DojoFAQ

When developing for the web, it is a recommended best practice to always test your application during development with a web server. This is for two primary reasons. By running a web server, you can approximate a production environment similar to how your application will be served to your users. Also, browsers implement a same-origin policy that is different for quasi-protocols like file://. Many of Dojo’s modules like dojo/i18n, dojo/text, Dijit templates, and dojox/gfx depend on loading files from the same origin.

Jun 24

REST tips

By on June 24, 2014 11:50 am

At SitePen, we have long been advocates for building web applications on a RESTful architecture. Over the last several years, it has been exciting to see organizations increasingly provide RESTful endpoints for the Dojo-based front-ends that we support and develop. A well-designed REST backend can be a excellent foundation for manageable, scalable applications, that will be ready to evolve into the future. I wanted to share a few tips for designing a set of RESTful services.

Jun 13

JSConf 2014 Adventures

By on June 13, 2014 12:27 pm

JSConf 2014Warm weather, ocean water, and sunburn. Yes, I just attended a JavaScript conference! JSConf is a three-day conference that has talks by a number of great speakers, split up with a “choose-your-own-adventure” day in the middle. The talks covered a wide variety of topics, from front end tooling to JavaScript robotics.

The first day of the conference had many great talks. The one that stood out the most to me was the User Interface Algorithms talk by Mark DiMarco. He described Voronoi Diagrams and, using The New York Times’ 512 Paths to the White House page, shows how they are used to determine which path to highlight in a tree based on the mouse position. He then examined the Amazon drop-down menu and explained how it knows when to keep submenus open.

May 29

Building on Persevere

By on May 29, 2014 11:11 am

Persevere is a server-side JavaScript framework that we started several years ago to help build RESTful web applications with clean separation of concerns, encapsulation, and the consistency of JavaScript in both client and server. Recently, we had the opportunity to work on a project that used the full capabilities of Persevere, leveraging many of its features and leading to some improvements as well. We wanted to share some insights on how to best leverage some of the unique features of Persevere.