If we chose our JavaScript Framework like we chose our music…

By on June 13, 2017 9:20 am

…we would all be using justin-bieber.js. We as an organization have been working with JavaScript since 2000. We have seen frameworks rise and fall, including being responsible for some of them. We have seen trends come and go. We have seen browser dominance ebb and flow. We have seen winners and losers. We have seen JavaScript go from an obscure simplistic scripting language to the language of the internet. Through all of this we have experienced and learned a lot. We would like to share some of that with you.

Probably the most common question we get asked as we get to know an organization is “What framework should I use?” No matter what some people would have you believe there is no straightforward answer. The answer though is founded in our typical response of “What are you trying to do?”

Typings for dojox/gfx

By on April 25, 2017 10:02 am

dojox/gfx is Dojo 1.x’s vector graphics library, with support for SVG, Canvas, and other legacy rendering environments through a drawing API based on the semantics of SVG. This API also provides the foundation for dojox/charting. Often the biggest challenge in working with vector graphics is the large number of possible configuration settings and permutations.

TypeScript makes it easier to leverage auto-complete within an editor. We’ve been working for a while to add and maintain typings for Dojo 1.x. One of SitePen’s support clients kindly suggested that it would be very valuable to put gfx and TypeScript together, and happily sponsored our efforts in making this happen!

Making TypeDoc better

By on April 20, 2017 11:01 am

Over the past several months, the SitePen team has been hard at work on Dojo 2 along with the tools and infrastructure to support it. Part of that infrastructure, and one of the major priorities for Dojo 2, is to have top notch developer documentation, complete with examples, tutorials, and API documentation. The early fruits of this labor can be seen on the new dojo.io website.

For API documentation of JavaScript projects, JSDoc is a solid tool that gets the job done, and we wanted to be able to use something similar for TypeScript. JSDoc has support for type annotations in source code documentation comments, but this is redundant in TypeScript as the type annotations are provided in the code. We wanted to find a tool that was similar and a defacto standard, but that would take advantage of the TypeScript compiler API to derive the types of nodes.

Time for InnerSource?

By on March 23, 2017 10:55 am

InnerSource is a series of strategies and tactics from the open source world that help companies share source code across teams. While it might seem odd at first, it turns out that the things that work for well-managed open source projects are really helpful for businesses that want to encourage a culture of collaboration and reuse.

Functional reactive programming and Observables in JavaScript, TypeScript, and Dojo 2

By on February 27, 2017 7:45 am

Functional programming and reactive programming principles are not new to JavaScript, but their adoption has recently become widespread across most modern frameworks and toolkits. The ease of using these approaches has improved as we’ve finally seen the decline of legacy browsers, and as we’ve seen the introduction of functional and reactive paradigms within ES6 and ES8.

Moving 4-ward with Intern

By on February 10, 2017 6:51 am

The motivation for Intern 4 is to make it easier to author tests with ES6+ features within tests, with or without transpilation.

Want to skim? Here’s the Intern Roadmap which lists our high level status for each Intern release going forward.

Or if you’re curious to know the details for our plans for Intern this year, read on:

Introducing Milestone Mayhem

By on February 1, 2017 11:33 am

Introducing Milestone Mayhem

With years of building large scale web apps, we’ve experienced almost everything that goes right and wrong during software development projects. So we created Milestone Mayhem, a card game that reflects the challenges and successes with app development.