Episode 45: Declaration – CSS, Music, Components

Our second episode in the 6-part series from JSConf US 2019 features interviews with Lara Schenck, Adam Giese, and Luke Herrington around the theme of declarative code. Lara’s talk made the compelling argument that CSS is a domain-specific declarative language where its input is classes and nodes and its output is visual presentation. We talk about how refactoring should be part of your CSS workflow, how a design system is like an API for your UI, and when it’s worth

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Getting Started with Electron, Typescript, React and Webpack

If you need to build a desktop application today, Electron is an increasingly common choice. It is cross-platform and is built using the same web technologies that you probably already know. We’re long-time users of Electron at SitePen, and have previously talked about Setting up Electron with Dojo. Here we will explore an opinionated approach to setting up Electron: TypeScript, React and Webpack.

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Episode 44: Community – Open Source, Call for Proposals

In the first episode of our 6-part series from JSConf US 2019, we talk with Tierney Cyren and Peter Aitken around the theme of community. We chat with Tierney about how communities often grow best organically, almost by accident. That some of the things we try to impose on communities are things like trying to mimic other communities, creating red tape before it’s necessary, and limiting use cases to the project’s original vision. Peter joins us to talk about Global

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Episode 43: Fun with Art

Members of the TalkScript team were onsite at NEJS Conf 2019 where we did a series of interviews with the conference speakers. We had a great time meeting these thought leaders and learning more about each of them and their talks. We’ve compiled the interviews into a four-part series to help share the essence of NEJS Conf 2019! Our final episode from NEJS features interviews with Adrienne Tacke and Trent Willis around the theme of using art to personalize and

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Episode 42: Rethinking Deployment

Members of the TalkScript team were onsite at NEJS Conf 2019 where we did a series of interviews with the conference speakers. We had a great time meeting these thought leaders and learning more about each of them and their talks. We’ve compiled the interviews into a four-part series to help share the essence of NEJS Conf 2019! Listen in as the team talks with Phil Hawksworth, Fred Schott, and Jeremy Wagner around the theme of rethinking how we build

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Episode 41: Giving Voice

Members of the TalkScript team were onsite at NEJS Conf 2019 where we did a series of interviews with the conference speakers. We had a great time meeting these thought leaders and learning more about each of them and their talks. We’ve compiled the interviews into a four-part series to help share the essence of NEJS Conf 2019! In this episode, we welcome Ash Banaszek and Tatiana Mac to discuss the importance of using our voice. We chat with Ash

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Episode 40: Beyond JavaScript

Members of the TalkScript team were onsite at NEJS Conf 2019 where we did a series of interviews with the conference speakers. We had a great time meeting these thought leaders and learning more about each of them and their talks. We’ve compiled the interviews into a four-part series to help share the essence of NEJS Conf 2019! This episode features interviews with Kas Perch, Luke Bonaccorsi, and Sebastian Golasch around the theme of using JavaScript beyond the typical website.

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WASM

Episode 39: WASM: Doing More Than Just Heating up your Computer

On this week’s show, Bryan, Paul, and Nick chat with Karl Guertin about all things WebAssembly. They start with an introduction to what WASM is, it’s history, and why it’s useful over other technologies and plugins that have come before. Then, they dive deep into its relationship with JavaScript and the underlying implementation details, including its advantages and disadvantages. Finally, they discuss where WASM is used, can be used, and will be used in the future. Speakers Paul Shannon on

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Episode 38: #private vs private: Adding ES private to TypeScript

We’re joined this week by Max Heiber who is part of a team at Bloomberg implementing #private fields in TypeScript, Daniel Rosenwasser who is the program manager for the TypeScript team at Microsoft, and Ryan Cavanaugh who is a developer on the TypeScript team at Microsoft. Naturally, we’ll be talking about the ECMAScript #private field proposal and how its implementation affects TypeScript—which already has a type of private field that uses the private keyword. As you might expect, there’s a

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Using Progressive Enhancement to Design for Accessibility

The web is for everyone. That includes web apps built on web architecture. If you haven’t heard the word “accessibility” mentioned in the last couple of years, you may have been living under a rock. Building accessible, inclusive web apps that support users with disabilities is becoming standard protocol. Have you updated Slack lately? Those color changes weren’t just a visual refresh for the UI; they were part of a conscious shift towards accessibility across their application. For many UI

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Episode 37: Stencil: Using TypeScript to Build Web Components

Josh Thomas and Adam Bradley join us from Ionic to talk about the Ionic component library and Stencil, a toolchain for building reusable components. As web technologies have changed and improved, so did Ionic—leveraging TypeScript, its build tools, JSX, and the Web Components specification. We dive deep into how Stencil leverages the TypeScript tooling to create components that work well with a variety of frameworks. As the Web Components specification evolved, so did Stencil—Josh and Adam explain the problems they

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Using WebAssembly with Web Workers

When building web apps, writing processing intensive code can be a challenge. One issue is getting predictable running times across browsers and JavaScript engines that optimise different code paths differently, as well as producing code that doesn’t interfere with user experience. Since 2010 we’ve had a standardised way to manage interactivity for long, non-DOM related tasks. Web Workers allow for offloading processing onto a separate thread keeping the main thread free. Recently we have seen the growth of another specification,

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