Blog

Intern and JavaScript Testing in 2017

By on June 22, 2017 12:24 pm

Since we released Intern in 2013, the state of JavaScript testing has changed substantially. The JavaScript world was a very different place. Node.js was at version 0.8, and core modules like http were still being heavily developed! Popular tools like webpack, React, and TypeScript were still in the early stages of development. Jasmine was probably the most popular testing framework for JavaScript, although there were were several other tools in common use such as Mocha and QUnit. WebDriver testing with JavaScript was still a fairly manual affair unless you used a cloud testing service like Sauce Labs or BrowserStack.

Moving 4-ward with Intern

By on February 10, 2017 6:51 am

The motivation for Intern 4 is to make it easier to author tests with ES6+ features within tests, with or without transpilation.

Want to skim? Here’s the Intern Roadmap which lists our high level status for each Intern release going forward.

Or if you’re curious to know the details for our plans for Intern this year, read on:

Intern 3.4 Released

By on December 8, 2016 3:31 pm

Today we’re pleased to announce the release of Intern 3.4. This release brings usability enhancements and bugfixes, including a new benchmarking mode! We’ve outlined some of the features below, but as always, visit the release notes for more details.

A number of contributors made this release possible. Thanks to all of them for their code and issue submissions. We’d especially like to thank Mozilla Open Source Support for their sponsorship of the performance benchmarking functionality.

Running Intern Tests in the Cloud

By on October 11, 2016 7:43 am

With Intern you can easily run tests using your local machine’s web browser or on any other machine running a Selenium server. Sometimes a project will need to be tested across a wide range of platforms and browsers, more than an individual user or even an enterprise may have available. Cloud testing services such as BrowserStack, CrossBrowserTesting, Sauce Labs, and TestingBot provide access to hundreds of VMs running various combinations of platform and browser versions.  Intern has out-of-the-box support for several such services.

Introducing intern-cli

By on August 3, 2016 6:05 am

Intern Logo

One of Intern’s goals has always been to make writing high-quality tests easier, but running those tests hasn’t always been straightforward. Now there‘s a new way to run Intern tests — intern-cli. This package provides an intern command that has a POSIX-like interface, using familiar flags and options like --help. It follows some conventions that make running Intern simpler, and provides plenty of inline help. It even makes getting started with Intern easier with a new init command.

Simplifying Intern tests with Command helpers

By on April 19, 2016 7:21 am

Intern Logo

Intern, via the Leadfoot WebDriver library, provides a lot of low-level control over the browsers it uses to run tests. Tests can navigate to new pages, resize the browser window, examine elements on a page, and interact with controls like inputs and buttons. Unfortunately, with all this power can come great complexity. Many testing tasks will involve a large number of low-level operations and dealing with these can be error prone and make tests difficult to follow. Command helpers to the rescue!

Intern 2.2 released

By on December 5, 2014 12:24 pm

Today we’re pleased to announce the release of Intern 2.2. Along with improvements to existing functionality and a few bug fixes, this release includes a new console-mode reporter that provides a more detailed view of the testing process and improved rendering of differences between objects. Full details are in the release notes; read on for some of the highlights!

Intern 2.1 released

By on September 12, 2014 9:06 pm

Today we’re happy to announce the release of Intern 2.1. This release contains several bugfixes and improvements to existing functionality, as well as new features to make running tests and handling test results easier. The full list of enhancements and bugfixes is available in the release notes. Here are some of the highlights!

More output options

Two new reporters have been added to Intern: an HTML reporter for the browser client and a JUnit XML reporter.

The HTML reporter is a new default reporter for Intern’s browser client runner (client.html). It displays at the end of a test run, summarizing the test results and presenting them in an easy-to-read format:

The output of the JUnit reporter, on the other hand, is meant for machine consumption. It aggregates test results and outputs them in a report.xml file that follows generally accepted standards for JUnit-compatible XML. This makes it much easier to plug Intern into tools that accept JUnit reports, like Jenkins.