Author: Peter Higgins

Quick Fixes and Dojo Support

A lot of the stock Dijit components are single-serve, meaning they only solve one style of problem. But Dojo is very flexible, and can work most any way you imagine or intend — you just have to put on your coder hat, and bend away. That’s where I come in. One of the things I do most often in my role as lead support for SitePen’s Dojo Support offering is to find simple solutions and workarounds for problems encountered when

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Dojo: Building Blocks of the Web

Dojo is a very flexible toolkit. Most every aspect of its functionality is extensible by taking advantage of JavaScript’s dynamic nature. Today, I’m going to show you how you can write your own modular reusable code to create a generic component you can provide others (perhaps your development team, or designers?) to use in whichever way they desire … Just like the toolkit itself.

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Implementing a Web Application Preloading Overlay

A common issue encountered when developing web applications with the Dojo Toolkit is a startup lag caused by the dynamic loading of modules and resources, further aggravated by a flash of unstyled content before the template system kicks in and sets up your widgets. This is especially true when using numerous Dijit components, and even more apparent when not using a custom build (such as loading your files from the Google or the AOL CDN). While it is typically recommended

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I’m Not Flash

Much like a magpie, I find myself oddly infatuated with shiny things. When a UI component somewhere just screams elegance, I find myself compelled to use it. A lot of the time a simple right-click will indicate the said UI was implemented in Flash, and it loses a tiny piece of street-cred. I’m most impressed by FX when they enhance the user experience. By using subtle FX during transitions (or an element fading out rather than harshly ‘disappearing’ for example)

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Dojo-Mini: Optimization Tricks with the Dojo Toolkit

The Dojo Toolkit 1.1 introduces support to run within Adobe’s AIR environment, and I think it may have re-sparked my interest in ActionScript. It was a lot easier than I had anticipated to get started coding, but came to a halt when it occurred to me that my newly created .air installer and badge would be at best a ~5MB download simply because of the default release size. A 5MB “Hello AIR” app is less than unimpressive, so I immediately

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