Category: browsers

Episode 40: Beyond JavaScript

Members of the TalkScript team were onsite at NEJS Conf 2019 where we did a series of interviews with the conference speakers. We had a great time meeting these thought leaders and learning more about each of them and their talks. We’ve compiled the interviews into a four-part series to help share the essence of NEJS Conf 2019! This episode features interviews with Kas Perch, Luke Bonaccorsi, and Sebastian Golasch around the theme of using JavaScript beyond the typical website.

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Episode 36: Build Frameworks into the Browser? Preserving the Space to Iterate

Alex Russell joins us from Google, where he works on Chrome and the web platform, to discuss calls to put every conceivable framework into the browser. We reminisce about all the times we’ve heard similar requests and some of the problems we’ve seen created over the years by frameworks and libraries being too aggressive in pushing things forward. From Applets to frameworks to WASM, we’ve seen a variety of approaches to add functionality to the browser. Alex calls a lot

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Augmented Reality on the Web in 2019

Augmented Reality (AR) brings digital information or media and interweaves it with our experience of the real-world. In recent years Augmented Reality has become apparent in the consumer space in two major formats: head mounted displays such as the Microsoft HoloLens and the Magic Leap along with more widely available experiences on mobile devices. Here the applications normally take hold of the device’s camera and then impose digital artifacts onto the device’s viewport. Some examples of popular mobile based Augmented

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Browser Automation with Puppeteer

Automating browsers provide many benefits including faster execution of repetitive tasks, ability to parallelise workloads and improved test coverage for your website. Google recently announced Puppeteer, a new tool to assist with Chrome browser automation.

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Can Flash Thrive Going Forward?

The short answer: Yes, if it changes its strategy to one that embraces and augments the open web ecosystem, rather than continuing down the path of trying to compete with or replace it. With the recent anti-Flash, pro-HTML5 buzz caused by the iPad and sites like YouTube offering HTML5-enabled video alternatives, I thought it would be useful to share my thoughts on the opportunities and struggles Adobe faces with the Flash platform. Given my propensity as a strong open-source advocate,

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Performance Testing of the Top 100 Sites is Misleading at Best

Recently, a number of performance tests have been released that are based on the performance of the top 100 web sites such as SpriteMe savings, the IE8 100 top sites test results, or the JSMeter research. These are in direct contrast with tests such as ACID3 which attempt to test the future of the web rather than just what’s possible today. These efforts are outstanding and highly useful, especially the JSMeter work and their valiant effort to redefine performance tests

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Convergence of Chrome OS and Android?

Google recently was asked about something we have suspected: Android and Chrome OS may converge. From our perspective, Android and Chrome OS both offer compelling opportunities for building great web apps, but having two distinct operating systems from Google, each with different approaches to development, just adds complexity and confusion to the overall development landscape. Of course, it still bothers us that iPhone apps and Dashboard widgets aren’t interoperable. Android has the first mover advantage of being deployed today to

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Gears is Dead? Long live Gears!

It was recently reported that Google Dumps Gears for HTML5. If true, with the investment Google has made in HTML5, Chrome, Chrome OS, and Chrome Frame, this is not surprising, but it does leave a potential short-term gap for offline application development. In their post, Read-Write Web asks if offline access is even necessary any longer. I guess they don’t spend enough time on airplanes or at hotels and conferences with poor internet connectivity! It’s certainly necessary, and while other

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Why We Love Chrome Frame

Google today announced Chrome Frame, a plug-in that selectively upgrades Internet Explorer without breaking existing sites. Think of it as working like Flash, but for open web technologies, replacing Internet Explorer’s entire rendering engine for sites that include a single meta tag indicating that they would prefer to use Chrome Frame rather than IE. So why is this a good thing?

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iTunes Store now based on WebKit

In the continuing blurring of the lines between web and desktop, Apple has moved the iTunes Store in iTunes 9 to use WebKit as its rendering engine. I was actually surprised to learn this was not always the case, especially with Apple adding Safari for Windows a while back. The rest of iTunes remains a custom desktop user interface, but it would not surprise me to see iTunes 10 be completely rendered using open web techniques. We already see competing

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