Getting started with Intern 4

By on August 30, 2017 1:00 pm

Unless you have a time machine or a TARDIS, it’s pretty rare to have solid documentation in place before an open source project is released! While we’re getting close to a beta release with the Intern 4 and while we still have a fair amount of documentation and refinements to complete, a number of people have started using Intern 4 to leverage its support for easier testing with modern ES6+ and/or TypeScript features.

Web Frameworks: Testing

By on August 29, 2017 10:27 am

Test early, test often, and test some more. Why put our heart and soul into our web applications only to be let down because we are not completely testing them. Let’s explore how the different web frameworks approach testing.

Intern and JavaScript Testing in 2017

By on June 22, 2017 12:24 pm

Since we released Intern in 2013, the state of JavaScript testing has changed substantially. The JavaScript world was a very different place. Node.js was at version 0.8, and core modules like http were still being heavily developed! Popular tools like webpack, React, and TypeScript were still in the early stages of development. Jasmine was probably the most popular testing framework for JavaScript, although there were were several other tools in common use such as Mocha and QUnit. WebDriver testing with JavaScript was still a fairly manual affair unless you used a cloud testing service like Sauce Labs or BrowserStack.

Moving 4-ward with Intern

By on February 10, 2017 6:51 am

The motivation for Intern 4 is to make it easier to author tests with ES6+ features within tests, with or without transpilation.

Want to skim? Here’s the Intern Roadmap which lists our high level status for each Intern release going forward.

Or if you’re curious to know the details for our plans for Intern this year, read on:

SeleniumConf 2016 Recap

By on December 20, 2016 7:03 am

Selenium is the leading tool for browser and mobile app automation and functional testing. Each year the Selenium community gets together to talk about emerging trends with Selenium and testing best practices in general. This year’s event was held in London at the Mermaid Theatre along the Thames. The conference provided an excellent opportunity to meet the key members of the Selenium team and other people and companies focused on testing. Here are some highlights from this year’s conference.

Intern Visual Regression Plugin

By on December 15, 2016 7:31 am

Thanks to a generous Mozilla Open Source Support program award, Intern has expanded its testing ecosystem to include new and robust sets of tools. Engineers can now easily write tests to benchmark sections of code, test for accessibility (a11y) support, and test for visual differences. Today we’ll show you how to use Intern’s Visual Regression plugin to test for visual changes using a simple web page.

Intern 3.4 Released

By on December 8, 2016 3:31 pm

Today we’re pleased to announce the release of Intern 3.4. This release brings usability enhancements and bugfixes, including a new benchmarking mode! We’ve outlined some of the features below, but as always, visit the release notes for more details.

A number of contributors made this release possible. Thanks to all of them for their code and issue submissions. We’d especially like to thank Mozilla Open Source Support for their sponsorship of the performance benchmarking functionality.

Running Intern Tests in the Cloud

By on October 11, 2016 7:43 am

With Intern you can easily run tests using your local machine’s web browser or on any other machine running a Selenium server. Sometimes a project will need to be tested across a wide range of platforms and browsers, more than an individual user or even an enterprise may have available. Cloud testing services such as BrowserStack, CrossBrowserTesting, Sauce Labs, and TestingBot provide access to hundreds of VMs running various combinations of platform and browser versions.  Intern has out-of-the-box support for several such services.