Intern and JavaScript Testing in 2017

By on June 22, 2017 12:24 pm

Since we released Intern in 2013, the state of JavaScript testing has changed substantially. The JavaScript world was a very different place. Node.js was at version 0.8, and core modules like http were still being heavily developed! Popular tools like webpack, React, and TypeScript were still in the early stages of development. Jasmine was probably the most popular testing framework for JavaScript, although there were were several other tools in common use such as Mocha and QUnit. WebDriver testing with JavaScript was still a fairly manual affair unless you used a cloud testing service like Sauce Labs or BrowserStack.

Web Frameworks: User Interface Development

By on June 16, 2017 4:32 pm

Whether it is Top 40 or classical or R&B, artists and music have a recognizable look and feel. When looking at frameworks, some simply provide us with a bag of instruments, while others provide us with chord progressions and album covers we can customize.

If we chose our JavaScript Framework like we chose our music…

By on June 13, 2017 9:20 am

…we would all be using justin-bieber.js. We as an organization have been working with JavaScript since 2000. We have seen frameworks rise and fall, including being responsible for some of them. We have seen trends come and go. We have seen browser dominance ebb and flow. We have seen winners and losers. We have seen JavaScript go from an obscure simplistic scripting language to the language of the internet. Through all of this we have experienced and learned a lot. We would like to share some of that with you.

Probably the most common question we get asked as we get to know an organization is “What framework should I use?” No matter what some people would have you believe there is no straightforward answer. The answer though is founded in our typical response of “What are you trying to do?”

TC39: Open and Incremental Approach Improves Standards Process

By on April 6, 2017 6:29 am

In our recent post about the key features in ES2017, I was reminded just how much the standards process has changed in the past 15 years. As someone who tried to get involved early to improve standards, the process was broken and I was quickly discouraged. However, much has changed since the early days of the web.

Back in the early 2000s, standards bodies attempted to codify features already implemented, and attempts to extend the web were often overly complex. The process typically occurred behind closed doors, usually with a few large companies attempting to push their technology agenda, with little opportunity for the public to participate in the process other than perhaps a mailing list. The collaborative tools we rely on today simply did not exist, and most browser implementations were not based on open source software. Simply put, it was difficult to make progress in that environment.

Here we’ll look at the non-technical side of the standards process, and how modern web standards are evolving in a more open and collaborative manner, leading to a better web platform.

Functional reactive programming and Observables in JavaScript, TypeScript, and Dojo 2

By on February 27, 2017 7:45 am

Functional programming and reactive programming principles are not new to JavaScript, but their adoption has recently become widespread across most modern frameworks and toolkits. The ease of using these approaches has improved as we’ve finally seen the decline of legacy browsers, and as we’ve seen the introduction of functional and reactive paradigms within ES6 and ES8.

Moving 4-ward with Intern

By on February 10, 2017 6:51 am

The motivation for Intern 4 is to make it easier to author tests with ES6+ features within tests, with or without transpilation.

Want to skim? Here’s the Intern Roadmap which lists our high level status for each Intern release going forward.

Or if you’re curious to know the details for our plans for Intern this year, read on: