Blog

Apr 25

Typings for dojox/gfx

By on April 25, 2017 10:02 am

dojox/gfx is Dojo 1.x’s vector graphics library, with support for SVG, Canvas, and other legacy rendering environments through a drawing API based on the semantics of SVG. This API also provides the foundation for dojox/charting. Often the biggest challenge in working with vector graphics is the large number of possible configuration settings and permutations.

TypeScript makes it easier to leverage auto-complete within an editor. We’ve been working for a while to add and maintain typings for Dojo 1.x. One of SitePen’s support clients kindly suggested that it would be very valuable to put gfx and TypeScript together, and happily sponsored our efforts in making this happen!

Apr 20

Making TypeDoc better

By on April 20, 2017 11:01 am

Over the past several months, the SitePen team has been hard at work on Dojo 2 along with the tools and infrastructure to support it. Part of that infrastructure, and one of the major priorities for Dojo 2, is to have top notch developer documentation, complete with examples, tutorials, and API documentation. The early fruits of this labor can be seen on the new dojo.io website.

For API documentation of JavaScript projects, JSDoc is a solid tool that gets the job done, and we wanted to be able to use something similar for TypeScript. JSDoc has support for type annotations in source code documentation comments, but this is redundant in TypeScript as the type annotations are provided in the code. We wanted to find a tool that was similar and a defacto standard, but that would take advantage of the TypeScript compiler API to derive the types of nodes.

Apr 6

TC39: Open and Incremental Approach Improves Standards Process

By on April 6, 2017 6:29 am

In our recent post about the key features in ES2017, I was reminded just how much the standards process has changed in the past 15 years. As someone who tried to get involved early to improve standards, the process was broken and I was quickly discouraged. However, much has changed since the early days of the web.

Back in the early 2000s, standards bodies attempted to codify features already implemented, and attempts to extend the web were often overly complex. The process typically occurred behind closed doors, usually with a few large companies attempting to push their technology agenda, with little opportunity for the public to participate in the process other than perhaps a mailing list. The collaborative tools we rely on today simply did not exist, and most browser implementations were not based on open source software. Simply put, it was difficult to make progress in that environment.

Here we’ll look at the non-technical side of the standards process, and how modern web standards are evolving in a more open and collaborative manner, leading to a better web platform.

Mar 29

What TypeScript can offer to Dojo 1.x

By on March 29, 2017 7:24 am

As many of you know, Dojo 2 is being built on TypeScript. Many of us involved in Dojo 2 believe that TypeScript brings several advantages to developing with web technologies these days. Features like structural typing and interfaces help us write code that is less prone to errors as well as being able to express to those consuming Dojo 2 what the intent of the code is.

If you have worked with Dojo 1 for any extended period of time, you will realise how feature rich and complex the Dojo Toolkit is. Because of the power and backwards compatibility of Dojo 1, it can often be daunting, even for an experienced user, to effectively use Dojo. If as a developer, you need to utilise a new part of Dojo, it can be confusing to understand what part of the API to use and how to use it. I know from personal experience, I would often review the test cases for a part of Dojo I wasn’t familiar with to try to figure out what the intent of the original author was.

As we have continued to work on Dojo 2, several of us realised that TypeScript could offer a lot to Dojo 1, potentially allowing people to start to migrate code to TypeScript and ES6+, making their current code even better, but giving them an easier path to the future. In order to be effective at using TypeScript with Dojo 1, we need to do a bit of enablement.

Feb 27

Functional reactive programming and Observables in JavaScript, TypeScript, and Dojo 2

By on February 27, 2017 7:45 am

Functional programming and reactive programming principles are not new to JavaScript, but their adoption has recently become widespread across most modern frameworks and toolkits. The ease of using these approaches has improved as we’ve finally seen the decline of legacy browsers, and as we’ve seen the introduction of functional and reactive paradigms within ES6 and ES8.

Feb 10

Moving 4-ward with Intern

By on February 10, 2017 6:51 am

The motivation for Intern 4 is to make it easier to author tests with ES6+ features within tests, with or without transpilation.

Want to skim? Here’s the Intern Roadmap which lists our high level status for each Intern release going forward.

Or if you’re curious to know the details for our plans for Intern this year, read on:

Dec 20

SeleniumConf 2016 Recap

By on December 20, 2016 7:03 am

Selenium is the leading tool for browser and mobile app automation and functional testing. Each year the Selenium community gets together to talk about emerging trends with Selenium and testing best practices in general. This year’s event was held in London at the Mermaid Theatre along the Thames. The conference provided an excellent opportunity to meet the key members of the Selenium team and other people and companies focused on testing. Here are some highlights from this year’s conference.